#BDSfail: British authorities remove anti-Israel ads from London Underground trains

 

Around 500 anti-Israel posters nefariously placed on London’s Tube as part of BDS’s ‘Israel Apartheid Week’ sparks outrage.
• PM Netanyahu rejects Knesset member Lapid’s claim of credit for the removal of the posters.

By Shlomo Cesana, Israel Hayom Staff & Reuters

 

Around 500 anti-Israel posters are being removed from London Underground trains after sparking outrage that echoed all the way from the British capital to Jerusalem.

Anti-Israel posters on a London Underground train

The posters were put up by pro-Palestinian activists as part of the annual “Israel Apartheid Week,” which began in the United Kingdom on Sunday.

A spokeswoman for Transport for London, the authority responsible for the underground “Tube” network, said the ads had been posted without authorization and constituted “an act of vandalism which we take extremely seriously.”

Some of the posters claimed that British-made weapons were used by Israel to “massacre” Palestinians during Operation Protective Edge during the summer of 2014. Other posters criticized the British security company G4S for operating in Israeli prisons.

Information about the posters reached the Israeli Embassy in London on Sunday, at which point embassy officials began working to have them removed. Foreign Ministry Director General Dore Gold, who happened to be in London, also took part in this effort.

Yet on Monday, Yesh Atid leader Yair Lapid claimed credit for the removal of the posters. At a Yesh Atid faction meeting, Lapid said he had caused the removal of the posters by telephoning London Mayor Boris Johnson to complain.

“Since the government of Israel, as usual, did nothing, I talked to Johnson, a great friend of Israel, and explained to him that the State of Israel will not tolerate such things,” Lapid said.

 

View original Israel Hayom publication at:
http://www.israelhayom.com/site/newsletter_article.php?id=31939

 

posters on London trains

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