Tag Archive for Israel Antiquities Authority

Egyptian and church officials upset after Police subdue Monk in Jerusalem

Police and Coptic priests scuffle outside Jerusalem’s Church of the Holy Sepulcher in protest of planned restoration work; Egyptian Foreign Ministry condemns behavior of Israel Police officers’ handling of the incident.

By AP

 

A scuffle between police forces and Coptic priests at a major Christian holy site in Jerusalem on Wednesday drew condemnation from Egypt and churches in the Holy Land.

Police and Coptic priests wrangled outside a contested chapel at the Church of the Holy Sepulcher in Jerusalem, where many Christians believe Jesus was crucified, buried and resurrected.

Israel Police contain rowdy Coptic priests protesting outside the Church of the Holy Sepulcher in Jerusalem.

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Rare, 2000+ year-old gold earring unearthed in the City of David, Jerusalem

The dazzling golden earring, definitely worn by someone from ancient Jerusalem‘s upper class, dates back to the 2nd or 3rd century BCE, during the Hellenistic period.

By Arutz Sheva Staff

 

A Hellenistic-era golden earring, featuring ornamentation of a horned animal, was discovered in the Givati Parking Lot in the City of David National Park encircling walls of Jerusalem’s Old City.

The discovery was made during archaeological digs carried out by the Antiquities Authority and Tel Aviv University.

The spectacular gold earring, shaped like a horned animal, dates back to the second or third century BCE, during the Hellenistic period. Continue Reading »

2,700 yr-old seal with, ‘Governor of Jerusalem’ found near Western Wall

Seal was discovered in Jerusalem’s Old City during excavation of First Temple era building near Western Wall Plaza.
• Israel Antiquities Authority says artifact was likely attached to shipment or sent as souvenir on behalf of the governor.

By Yori Yalon, Reuters and Israel Hayom Staff

 

Israeli archaeologists revealed a 2,700-year-old clay seal impression that they said belonged to a biblical governor of Jerusalem.

The artifact, inscribed in an ancient Hebrew script as “belonging to the governor of the city,” was likely attached to a shipment or sent as a souvenir on behalf of the governor, the most prominent local position held in Jerusalem at the time, the Israel Antiquities Authority said. Continue Reading »

Pro-Palestinian NGO maneuvering for control over Israel’s archeological discoveries

While cynical resolutions are passed without credence at UNESCO and other United Nations NGOs with impunity, it would be disastrous for Israel to intrust “neutral” international bodies to oversee archeology discoveries in Jerusalem, for surely first the Jewish connection would disappear, followed by Christianity’s.

BY DANIEL K. EISENBUD

 

In Israel, archeology is far more than just science.

Indeed, perhaps more than any other country, the stakes of antiquities unearthed here could not be higher in terms of geopolitical implications used by warring factions to determine “facts on the ground” in the most contested region in the world.

Magdala stone with Menorah that was found in the Archaeological site inside the Migdal Synagogue area – Photo- Wikimedia Commons/Hanay

The battle between right- and left-wing ideologues is evident at archeological sites in east Jerusalem and the West Bank, where discoveries are routinely exhibited to the world as evidence of Israeli sovereignty in the Jewish homeland or as an occupier. Continue Reading »

Germany: Dead Sea Scrolls Aren’t Israel’s

Based on UN and UNESCO resolutions against Israel’s/Jewish claims to historical sites, the German government decided not to recognize the Dead Sea Scrolls as Israeli property, prompting the Israel Antiquities Authority’s refusal to send them to a scheduled 2019 Frankfurt exhibit, without the customary governmental ‘Immunity from Seizure’ guarantee.

By BENJAMIN WEINTHAL

 

Uwe Becker, the deputy mayor of Frankfurt, expressed outrage on Thursday over the German government’s decision not to recognize the Dead Sea Scrolls as Israeli property, prompting the cancellation of a slated 2019 exhibit at the Bible Museum in Frankfurt.

“If Germany is unwilling to clearly express the legal status of the fragments of Qumran as Israeli world cultural heritage goods, it would dramatically change the coordinates in our German-Israeli relations. Continue Reading »

Israeli archaeologists confirm Babylonian assault on Jerusalem from latest discovery

 

The latest archaeological findings unearthed at the City of David, an excavation site in Jerusalem, help prove the destruction of the ancient Jewish city at the hands of the Babylonians.

By i24NEWS

 

New archaeological findings at a controversial excavation site in Jerusalem help prove the destruction of the ancient city at the hands of the Babylonians.

Less than a week before Tisha B’Av, the Jewish holiday which mourns the destruction of the Jewish temple, the Israel Antiquities Authority announced the latest research from its painstaking excavation.

Other artifacts which attest to Jerusalem’s affluence prior to the Babylonian assault on the city 2,600 years ago.

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Israel Antiquities Authority discover Crusader-era escape tunnel near Sea of Galilee

 

Israel Antiquities Authority workers uncover a hidden tunnel in Tiberias through which it is believed served as an escape route during the July 1187 siege, by Muslim ruler Salah a-Din.
• The Mayor of Tiberias to feature the newly discovered tunnel in the town’s development plan.

By Yori Yalon

 

Tunneling through time: An archaeological excavation by the Israel Antiquities Authority has unearthed an 800-year-old tunnel that researchers think served as an escape route from a Crusader fortress in Tiberias to the Sea of Galilee.

The tunnel – Photo curtesy: Israel Antiquities Authority

The tunnel, which appears to have been constructed by Crusaders some 800 years ago, runs underground for 7 meters (23 feet) and is exposed at one end near the promenade in the Old City of Tiberias. Continue Reading »

9 Byzantine-era bronze coins discovered in roadwork west of Jerusalem

 

The rare trove of nine bronze coins dating back to the 7th century C.E. was found during excavation held to allow the expansion of a major highway.
• The coins display embossed Byzantine-era emperors and Christian crosses, that were all minted in locations that are now present-day Turkey.

By Yori Yalon

 

A cache of nine bronze coins dating back to the end of the Byzantine period, or the seventh century C.E., was recently uncovered during an Israel Antiquities Authority excavation.

The excavation, which began last June as part of roadwork to expand a section of Highway 1 running west of Jerusalem, uncovered what was a large two-story building and a wine press — part of a larger complex apparently used by Christian pilgrims on their way to Jerusalem. Continue Reading »

2,000 year-old ‘Emperor’s Road’ discovered, ancient coins unearthed

 

Approximately 1.5 kilometers long and 6 meters wide with inset pavement stones, the Roman period road, along with the ancient coins were unearthed by students, under the supervision of the Israel Antiquities Authority.

By 

 

A wide and well-preserved 2,000-year-old road dating to the Roman period was unearthed last month during archaeological excavations carried out by the Israel Antiquities Authority and students near Beit Shemesh.

The dig, located just off of Highway 375, was conducted prior to laying a water pipeline to Jerusalem at the initiative of the  water corporation Mei Shemesh.

The ancient coins discovered during the excavation.

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Unique 3,800 yr-old jug designed with human sculpture unearthed near Tel Aviv

 

The students that participate in the excavation of the unique pottery vessel are part of a new training curriculum, which seeks to connect them with the past, and help secure archaeologists of the future.

By DANIEL K. EISENBUD

 

A rare and unusual 3,800-year-old jug from the Middle Bronze Age, featuring a human sculpture, was recently unearthed during an excavation in the city of Yehud, near Tel Aviv, with the assistance of area students, the Israel Antiquities Authority announced on Wednesday.

According to Gilad Itach, excavation director on behalf of the IAA, the discovery was made on the final day of a mandatory dig prior to the construction of several residential buildings in the area. Continue Reading »

Ancient gold, silver artifacts discovered at Israeli archeological site

 

Eight months after a 2000yr-old gold coin, minted in Rome, was accidentally found in northern Israel, now a new trove of ancient gold & silver artifacts were discovered at the Tel Gezer archeological site.

By ARIEL WHITMAN

 

A treasure trove of gold and silver objects dating back about 3,600 years from the Canaanite period has been found in the Tel Gezer excavation center.

The Israel Antiquities Authority and the Israel Nature and Parks Authority announced Monday that it believes the objects found were part of a ceremonial offering that was laid in the center of the structure being excavated. Continue Reading »

Palestinians now seek ownership of Dead Sea Scrolls via UNESCO

 

After repeated successful Palestinian inspired resolutions at UNESCO that ignored Jewish ties to the Temple Mount, Western Wall and Jerusalem, the Palestinian are now going after the Dead Sea Scrolls.

By TOVAH LAZAROFF

 

The Palestinian Authority is preparing to lay a claim to the Dead Sea Scrolls at the United Nations Education, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Israel Radio reported on Saturday night.

ANTIQUITIES AUTHORITY researchers utilize advanced technology to piece together thousands of fragments from the Dead Sea Scrolls. - Photo: ISRAEL ANTIQUITIES AUTHORITY

ANTIQUITIES AUTHORITY researchers utilize advanced technology to piece together thousands of fragments from the Dead Sea Scrolls. – Photo: ISRAEL ANTIQUITIES AUTHORITY

“This is another provocative and audacious attempt by the Palestinians to rewrite history and to erase our connection to our land,” Ambassador to UNESCO Carmel Shama-Hacohen said. Continue Reading »

Ancient papyrus scroll dating from 7th century BCE mentions Jerusalem in ancient Hebrew script

 

Israel Antiquities Authority presents evidence that refutes UNESCO resolution that rejects Jewish ties to Jerusalem and the Temple Mount.
• The stolen papyrus document from a Judean Desert cave, records a shipment to a First Temple period king, in ancient Hebrew script.

By Israel Hayom Staff

 

The UNESCO decision passed Wednesday declaring the Temple Mount to be a Muslim site of worship was immediately countered by the Israel Antiquities Authority, which presented a document dating from the seventh century BCE — the First Temple period — in which the name “Jerusalem” clearly appears in ancient Hebrew script.

The ancient papyrus that mentions Jerusalem - Photo: Israel Antiquities Authority/Channel 2 

The ancient papyrus that mentions Jerusalem – Photo: Israel Antiquities Authority/Channel 2

According to the authority, the papyrus document, which had been among the antiquities robbed from caves in the Judean Desert, represents the oldest external source found to date that cites Jerusalem. Continue Reading »

Scanning technology locate Jewish escape tunnel at Nazi massacre site

 

In Lithuania’s Ponar forest, an int’l research team using ground scanning equipment locate the tunnel which Jewish prisoners secretly dug out with spoons to escape their Nazi captors.

By The Associated Press & Israel Hayom Staff

 

In a Lithuanian forest, an international research team has pinpointed the location of a legendary tunnel that Jewish prisoners secretly dug out with spoons to try to escape their Nazi captors during World War II, the Israel Antiquities Authority announced Wednesday.

Preparation for electrical resistivity tomography scan of the pit used to hold the victims before their execution at Ponar massacre site near the town of Vilnius, Lithuania – Photo: Ezra Wolfinger

The tunnel in the Ponar forest, known today as Paneriai, outside the Lithuanian capital of Vilnius, is the site where some 100,000 people, including 70,000 Jews, were killed and thrown into pits during Nazi occupation. Continue Reading »

WATCH: Rare cache of silver coins from 135–126 BCE found in central Israel

view videoThe found cache of silver coins from the Hasmonean period, comprised of shekels and half-shekels, were minted in the city of Tyre and bear images of King Antiochus VII & his brother Demetrius II.

By i24news

 

A rare cache of silver coins dating back to the Hasmonean period has been discovered in the central Israeli city of Modi‘in alongside the wall of an agricultural estate during an archaeological excavation, the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) said Monday.

IAA archaeologist Shahar Krispin during the discovery of the silver coin hoard that was found in the estate house. – Photo: Assaf Peretz, Israel Antiquities Authority

The treasure was hidden in a rock crevice, up against a wall of an impressive agricultural estate that was discovered during the excavation. Continue Reading »